Billet-doux

Billet-Doux

Tom Disch (Thomas M. Disch)

This lovely, illustrated, limited-edition broadside features an account of Death’s struggle to find his peers (or even just a friend), told with the delicious black humor that you would have expected from Mr. Tom Disch.

$25.00

Billet-Doux

by Tom Disch (Thomas M. Disch)

ISBN: n/a

Published: 2007

Available Format(s): Broadsheet

Prior to Tachyon’s 2008 publication of Thomas Disch’s The Word of God, or, the Holy Writ Rewritten, we published this original broadside sheet of Disch’s recent poem, “Billet-doux.” It is an account of Death’s struggle to find his peers (or even just a friend), told with the delicious black humor that you would have expected from Mr. Disch.

The broadside, limited to 150 signed, numbered copies, was published in honor of Tachyon’s twelfth anniversary (celebrated at a grand soiree at Borderlands Books). It’s a lovely piece, with original art and design by the very talented Barry Barnes at Trained Eye Graphics. It was silk-screened and printed on Folio, an acid-free paper with deckle edges.

Thomas M. Disch was a novelist, poet, and book critic. His work was featured in the New York Times, Entertainment Weekly, Harper’s, The Nation, and the Hudson Review of Books. Disch was a major figure of science fiction’s new-wave movement. His books include Camp Concentration, On Wings of Song, The Word of God, and The Brave Little Toaster. His nonfiction book about poetry, The Castle of Indolence, was nominated for the National Book Critics Circle Award in 1996. John Clute famously described Disch as “perhaps the most respected, least trusted, most envied, and least read of all modern first-rank SF writers.” Disch passed away on July 4, 2008.

Praise for Thomas Disch

“One of the most remarkably talented writers around.”

Washington Post Book World

“Diversely gifted…entirely original…joyously versatile…a unique talent.”
Newsweek

“When it comes to Thomas Disch, label makers scratch their heads…. This literary chameleon redefined science fiction with novels that have been compared to the best from Orwell to Huxley, wrote best-selling children’s books about talking kitchen appliances, earned censure from the Catholic Church for an off-Broadway play, published light verse, twisted the pulp conventions of gothic fiction, experimented with interactive software, and demolished the American poetry establishment, UFO cults, and other sacred cows in brilliant critical essays.”
Minneapolis Star-Tribune

“I must relinquish my birthright atheism, in recognition of the presence of a literary god.”
—Norman Rush, National Book Award–winning author of Mortals

Visit the Thomas Disch website.

Thomas Disch committed suicide on July 4, 2008. Further information can be found here.