Blog

Tumblr

  • The latest reviews and mentions of Tachyon titles and authors from around the web.

    Lavie Tidhar (photo: Kevin Nixon. © Future Publishing 2013), Carmen Maria Machado, Daryl Gregory, Nalo Hopkinson (David Findlay), and Ellen Datlow


    Lavie Tidhar tweeted this out after receiving his Campbell Award for CENTRAL STATION.



    Carmen Maria Machado, contributor to Peter S. Beagle and Jacob Weisman‘s acclaimed THE NEW VOICES OF FANTASY, was named to the longlist for National Book Award in fiction for her collection HER BODY AND OTHER PARTIES: STORIES.

    Congratulations to all the honorees.



    Fiction:

    • Elliot Ackerman, DARK AT THE CROSSING (Knopf / Penguin Random House)
    • Daniel Alarcón, THE KING IS ALWAYS ABOVE THE PEOPLE: STORIES (Riverhead Books / Penguin Random House)
    • Charmaine Craig, MISS BURMA (Grove Press / Grove Atlantic)
    • Jennifer Egan, MANHATTAN BEACH  (Scribner / Simon & Schuster)
    • Min Jin Lee, PACHINKO (Grand Central Publishing / Hachette book Group)
    • Carmen Maria Machado, HER BODY AND OTHER PARTIES: STORIES (Graywolf Press)
    • Margaret Wilkerson Sexton, A KIND OF FREEDOM (Counterpoint Press)
    • Jesmyn Ward, SING, UNBURIED, SING (Scribner / Simon & Schuster)
    • Carol Zoref, BARREN ISLAND (New Issues Poetry & Prose)
    • Lisa Ko, THE LEAVERS (Algonquin Books / Workman Publishing)
    • Min Jin Lee, PACHINKO (Grand Central Publishing / Hachette book Group)
    • Carmen Maria Machado, HER BODY AND OTHER PARTIES: STORIES (Graywolf Press)
    • Margaret Wilkerson Sexton, A KIND OF FREEDOM (Counterpoint Press)
    • Jesmyn Ward, SING, UNBURIED, SING (Scribner / Simon & Schuster)
    • Carol Zoref, BARREN ISLAND (New Issues Poetry & Prose)


    For BOOK RIOT, Liberty Hardy’s list of 100 Must-Read Indie Press Books includes a pair of Tachyon publications.

    These 100 books lists always sound easy in theory, but then when I sit down to write one I discover compiling a list of, say, 100 science fiction debuts that are worth reading is a bit more work than I imagined.


    That’s not the case with this post! Indie publishers are amazing and there are sooooo many books out there worth your time. I wrote down the first 100 books that popped into my head that I have actually read and loved, and I bet I could easily do another list of 100 more. (I smell a sequel!)


    I’ve included a brief description from the publisher with each title. There are so many stunners here, this list should keep you busy for a while. Tell us in the comments about which of these you’ve read or other indie books you loved. Yay, books!

    WE ARE ALL COMPLETELY FINE by Daryl Gregory (Tachyon Publications): No one believes the extent of their horrific tales, not until they are sought out by psychotherapist Dr. Jan Sayer. What happens when these seemingly-insane outcasts form a support group? Together they must discover which monsters they face are within—and which are lurking in plain sight.


    FALLING IN LOVE WITH HOMINIDS by Nalo Hopkinson (Tachyon Publications): In this long-awaited collection, Hopkinson continues to expand the boundaries of culture and imagination. Whether she is retelling The Tempest as a new Caribbean myth, filling a shopping mall with unfulfilled ghosts, or herding chickens that occasionally breathe fire, Hopkinson continues to create bold fiction that transcends boundaries and borders.


    THE VIRTUAL MEMORIES SHOW welcomes Ellen Datlow to their podcast.

    Legendary (as in mega-award-winning) horror, science fiction and fantasy editor Ellen Datlow joins the show to talk about her career. We get into defining horror (and its subset, the conte cruel), how the business has changed and hasn’t, the proper care and feeding of writers, dealing with diversity and representation in the anthologies she edits, finding good stories in translation, the pros and cons of blurring genre boundaries, keeping up with new voices, her preference for editing short fiction over novels, the writers she wishes she solicited stories from, running the monthly Fantastic Fiction reading series at the KGB Bar, the editing lesson she got from Ben Bova, and why it’s never good when an author says, “This is the best thing I’ve ever written”!


    For info on WE ARE ALL COMPLETELY FINE, visit the Tachyon page.

    Cover design by Elizabeth Story


    For more information on FALLING IN LOVE WITH HOMINIDS, visit the Tachyon page.

    Cover art by Chuma Hill

    Design by Elizabeth Story


    For more info about NIGHTMARES: A NEW DECADE OF MODERN HORROR, visit the Tachyon page.

    Cover by Nihil

    Design by Elizabeth Story


    For more info about THE MONSTROUS, visit the Tachyon page.

    Cover by Reiko Murakami

    Cover design by Elizabeth Story


    For more info about THE CUTTING ROOM: DARK REFLECTIONS OF THE SILVER SCREEN, visit the Tachyon page.

    Cover by Josh Beatman


    For more info about LOVECRAFT’S MONSTERS, visit the Tachyon page.

    Cover by John Coulthart

  • image


    In THE HEDGEHOG REVIEW: VOL. 19 NO. 2 (SUMMER 2017), Noah J. Toly discusses Bruce Sterling’s Sidewise Award-nominated PIRATE UTOPIA.

    To West, the very power struggles of Europe in the first half of the twentieth century were etched into the cityscape of Fiume.


    The same Fiume—kind of—is the setting for Bruce Sterling’s 2016 science-fiction novel Pirate Utopia, which presents an alternative history of the city. Sterling’s Fiume is the titular pirate utopia, a city in which “an entire Babel of languages” is spoken by those who converge upon it from all over the world. Fiume’s leaders are captivated by Futurism, “united in defiance of the Church and the State,” and convinced by the power of industry and engineering to “defy the whole world from a modest Adriatic town.”17 They dream of writing into being a future uninhibited by the nation-state and the League of Nations. As the story unfolds, it becomes clear that Fiume’s technologies, and its drive for independence, are being directed toward the familiar ends of profiteering and power for power’s sake. In the end, the pirate regime gets its chance to turn against the nation-state in its preeminent form when its leaders are invited by a coterie of famous Americans, including Harry Houdini, H.P. Lovecraft, and Robert E. Howard, to join in a military coup to overthrow US president Woodrow Wilson.

    image

    The increasingly influential cities of the twenty-first century are, in some ways, like Sterling’s Fiume. In the wake of World War I, with Italy “half-graveyard, half-clearing-sale,” the fictional Fiume had accumulated machinery that had been heaped up and then abandoned by the nation-state: “Armored flame-throwers. Pneumatic drills for mountain warfare. Great spidery heaps of disused radio antennas. So many awesome and efficient things that a stricken world had bent every possible effort to build, and then forgotten.”18 These machines, coupled with the giant flying pontoon boats and flying torpedoes produced at a local factory, endowed the city with a distinct blend of inherited capabilities and novel techniques that were turned not to transformational purposes but to more familiar ends.


    image


    Zoran Krušvar for the Croatian NOVI LIST interviews Bruce Sterling.

    First of all, I’m very glad you wrote a novel about my town.


    - Oh, thank you for letting me out of town afterwards.


    Tell me, how did this happen? You are the man who travels a lot, you have seen many cities, why did you decide exactly for Rijeka?


    “I was at Tito’s Galeb, as part of the Festival Republic, where we talked about the history of Rijeka. This book is in some way the result of this gathering. I probably would have written it anyway, but there everything was crystallized there.


    The book is successful, I’m happy how it went off. So we can have other such gatherings and I believe that some similar fruits will be produced from them. Otherwise, I often pass through Rijeka, halfway between the cities I live in, Turin and Belgrade, and I can also stay in Krk, where I’m writing, so it was not particularly unlikely to write something about Rijeka. However, most of this novel about Rijeka I wrote in Turin.

    image

    Pirate Utopia
    What attracted you D'Annunzio and his time?


    - That is the time when Rijeka was truly the European Capital of Culture. There was a period of one and a half days when this town was an incredible place. There have been unheard of activities that have had the potential to change the world. Such cultural eruptions are rare, we can compare it with San Fancis in 1967, the Paris Commune, Five Million Days, or some other form of overthrow. These are dramatic events and of course I’m interested.


    If you lived in that moment, would you come to Rijeka?


    "There were a lot of writers who came, probably I would have visited it, but since I’m not a big supporter of political movements I would probably have written a sneaky comment and gone.

    Translation from Croatian courtesy of Google. 


    For more info on PIRATE UTOPIA, visit the Tachyon page.

    Cover and image by John Coulthart

  • The Internet continues to explode about the publication of the new edition of Patricia A. McKillip’s World Fantasy Award-winner THE FORGOTTEN BEASTS OF ELD, now available in paperback and for the first time as an ebook.


    On B&N SCI-FI & FANTASY BLOG, Joel Cunningham includes the book among This Week’s New Sci-Fi & Fantasy Books: A Cyborg Romance, the Future of Global Politics, and the Return of Forgotten Beasts.

    More than 40 years after it was first published, McKillip’s World Fantasy Award-winner is unquestionably a classic of the genre, and it reads as timelessly as ever in this new print and ebook edition. It’s the story of a woman named Sybel, who lives alone in a remote castle where she cares for a stable of magical creatures and hunts for a mythical bird, and how her world is shattered by the sudden appearance of Coren, a nobleman who delivers her a child and pulls her into a petty conflict between men. It’s a slender, beguiling story that does more with less, packing a complex, bewitching world and achingly real, frustratingly human characters into a page count that disguises the expansiveness of the ideas within.


    Nisi Shawl for THE SEATTLE REVIEW OF BOOKS praises the classic.

    As noted above, recent covers for Patricia McKillip’s fantasies are almost always painted by Kinuko Y Craft. Except when they’re not; a new reprint of her groundbreaking World Fantasy Award-winner THE FORGOTTEN BEASTS OF ELD (Tachyon) is graced instead by Thomas Canty’s art. And why not? McKillip’s soaring prose, lyrics to songs our hearts have forgotten they knew how to sing, deserves Canty’s accompaniment. The feminist underpinnings of the book’s plot — a self-sufficient woman who refuses to be stripped of her autonomy starts a war she swore never to fight — deserve our attention now as much as they did in 1974, when Beasts was first published. If you’ve never read it, you deserve to. Or if, like me, you read it long ago and have made do since with a tiny but affordable mass market paperback, you deserve Tachyon’s elegant trade paperback edition, at least half as beautiful as McKillip’s story. Which sounds stingy as compliments go, but is actually extremely high praise.



    BOOKWRAITHS enjoys the fantasy.

    THE FORGOTTEN BEASTS OF ELD is a wonderfully written, richly textured, high fantasy from Patricia A. McKillip.  Even though it is quite limited in length, it is still filled with insightful moments and fascinating insights; all of it set in beautifully rendered fairy tale world.

    What always catches me unprepared whenever I read (or reread) a Patricia A. McKillip novel is her unbelievable prose.  It isn’t elaborate or flowery, merely lyrical and purposeful.  Every word has its place and its use in her narratives, yet she never feels a need to expound unnecessarily.  Important events taking place in pages rather than chapters.  Concise, meaningful, and lovely.  That is how this author writes, and I only wish more fantasy offerings these days mimicked her style.


    As for the story itself, it was poignant, quick, and emotional.  Sybel’s life, her choices, and the ones she love caught up in the quagmire she has unknowingly been drawn into.  Her words and response to both the child and that which comes later filled with a layer of meaning and depth which will truly touches a reader’s heart strings.


    As for any criticisms or complaints, I have none.  McKillip has always been a writer I was in awe of, especially her amazing ability to craft an exciting fantasy tale that still finds a place for both dignity and seriousness in its pages, and THE FORGOTTEN BEASTS OF ELD was no exception, making me wonder only why it took me so long to actually read it.


    Lyrical, complex, concise, and emotional, this novel is one I will be readily espousing to lovers of high fantasy, fairy tales, and beautifully writing.  Patricia A. McKillip isn’t an author spoken of very often these days, but she should be, because her works are treasures of the genre.


    For more info about THE FORGOTTEN BEASTS OF ELD, visit the Tachyon page.

    Cover by Thomas Canty

  • image

    Daryl Gregory’s World Fantasy and Shirley Jackson Award-winning book WE ARE ALL COMPLETELY FINE  is a Kindle Daily Deal for Thursday, September 21.

    For today only, the ebook is available for just $1.99!

    • World Fantasy Award Winner
    • Shirley Jackson Award Winner
    • Nebula Award Nominee
    • Locus Award Nominee
    • Theodore Sturgeon Award Nominee
    • BookRiot 100 MUST-READ INDIE PRESS BOOKS 
    • Selected as the Horror After Dark Top Horror Read for 2014


    “Daryl Gregory’s We Are All Completely Fine is bitchin’ fun and as wicked and strange as a motorcycle leap through a ring of fire without your pants on. Loved it.”
    —Joe R. Lansdale, author of Cold in July and the Hap and Leonard series


    Harrison was the Monster Detective, a storybook hero. Now he’s in his mid-thirties and spends most of his time popping pills and not sleeping. Stan became a minor celebrity after being partially eaten by cannibals. Barbara is haunted by unreadable messages carved upon her bones. Greta may or may not be a mass-murdering arsonist. Martin never takes off his sunglasses. Never. No one believes the extent of their horrific tales, not until they are sought out by psychotherapist Dr. Jan Sayer. What happens when these seemingly-insane outcasts form a support group?  Together they must discover which monsters they face are within—and which are lurking in plain sight.


    “[STARRED REVIEW] This complex novel—scathingly funny, horrific yet oddly inspiring—constructs a seductive puzzle from torn identities, focusing on both the value and peril of fear. When enigmatic Dr. Jan Sayer gathers survivors of supernatural violence for therapy, she unwittingly unlocks evil from the prison of consciousness. Harrison, a cynical monster-hunter, wallows in lethargy. Suicidal Barbara burns to read the secret messages inscribed on her bones. Cantankerous Stan is the lone survivor of a cannibal feast. After paranoid Martin sees slithery spirits lingering around volatile Greta, a powerful young woman decorated with mystically charged scars, ancient evils usher the rag-tag survivors to a battle with the Hidden Ones, exiled deities trapped in prisons of flesh. Gregory’s beautiful imagery and metaphors bring bittersweet intimacy and tenderness to the primal wonder of star-lit legends. Isolated people, both victims and victimizers, are ghosts in a waking world, blind to their encounters with living nightmares. Blending the stark realism of pain and isolation with the liberating force of the fantastic, Gregory (Afterparty) makes it easy to believe that the world is an illusion, behind which lurks an alternative truth—dark, degenerate, and sublime.”
    —Publishers Weekly

    “…a clever and creepy horror tale…”
    —Library Journal

    “Clever, and filled with the creeping dread of what’s in the flickering shadow next to you and what’s just around the corner that suffuses the best horror. I loved it.”
    —Ellen Datlow, Bram Stoker, World Fantasy, and International Horror Guild award-winning editor of The Best Horror of the Year series

    “[Gregory’s] plotting, characterisations, and yes, the writing itself, is all that good. In short, this one completely blew me away….”
    Horror After Dark

    “Charming and horrifying—you won’t be able to stop reading it.”
    —Tim Powers, award-winning author of Declare and The Stress of Her Regard

    “Daryl Gregory is a writer I would happily follow into any dark place he wanted me to go. This is a labyrinth of a story, intricate as a spider’s web—and like a spider’s web, each piece informs the whole. Beautiful.”
    —Seanan McGuire, author of the October Daye series and Half-Off Ragnarok

    “A superb, haunting tale by one of our very best writers. Gregory’s characters are already in therapy; you may want to join them after reading this spicy, disturbing mélange.”
    —Robert J. Sawyer, Hugo Award-winning author of Red Planet Blues

    “[Gregory] is a truly gifted writer and We Are All Completely Fine is just more evidence to the fact.”
    —SFRevu

    “Lovecraft meets Cabin in the Woods in this tale of survivors of various supernatural horrors who come together in a support group to try to heal….fascinating”
    —Fantastic Reads

    “Gregory (Pandemonium, The Devil’s Alphabet, et. al.) has done it again with yet another singularly unique, genre-blending masterwork about a support group of victims of paranormal violence who realize that their nightmarish traumas are all related. This creepy concoction of supernatural fiction, mystery, and horror is a dark little literary gem that readers will absolutely cherish.”
    Paul Goat Allen, Barnes & Noble.com


    For info on WE ARE ALL COMPLETELY FINE, visit the Tachyon page.

    Cover design by Elizabeth Story

  • image


    Ellen Datlow, editor of NIGHTMARES: A NEW DECADE OF MODERN HORROR, THE MONSTROUS, THE CUTTING ROOM: DARK REFLECTIONS OF THE SILVER SCREEN, LOVECRAFT’S MONSTERS, HAUNTINGS, and DARKNESS: TWO DECADES OF MODERN HORROR, is the International Guest of Honour for Conflux 13, September 29-Oct 2.


    image


    • International Guest of Honour: Ellen Datlow
    • Guest of Honour: Angela Slatter
    • MC: Kaaron Warren
    • Music Guest: Meri Amber


    image


    Datlow is scheduled for several panels and events at the con. The final program will be available in the con magazine.


    For more info about NIGHTMARES: A NEW DECADE OF MODERN HORROR, visit the Tachyon page.

    Cover by Nihil

    Design by Elizabeth Story


    For more info about THE MONSTROUS, visit the Tachyon page.

    Cover by Reiko Murakami

    Cover design by Elizabeth Story

Next Page